Celebration Education

Mar 22-26

3/16 “it's a small world”

Around the World in 80 Days

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/disneyschooling/files/Small%20World%2...

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Around the World in 8 Days
1. make passports to visit eight countries

---song---

2. continents & oceans

3. Wisher

4, 5, 6 & 7. Travel the world

Tally

8. Race around the world

Materials:
1, blank paper
card stock
staplers
staples
2.map
lyrics
3.Wisher poster
wisher pictures
4.english muffins
jam
hieroglyphs
cartouches
pencils
paper
cloth
hummus
flatbread
plates
knives
bindi
population pie chart
noodles
sourdough bread
comparison chart of buildings
beans in jar
pictures of
-London
-palace guards
-Egypt
-Suez Canal
-Yemen
-Steamboat
-turban
-India
-elephants
-bindi
-China
-San Francisco
-Utah
-Wyoming
-Nebraska
-Illinois
-New York
8. blow-up globes
maps
flags
fairy-tale characters



Around the World in 8 Days

1. Make passports

---song---

2. Continents & oceans

3. Wisher

4, 5, 6 & 7. Travel the world

---Tally---

8. Race around the world



1.
Make passports

Gathering activity:
Kids can create there own passports and they must be stamped in each country and in the writing of that countries language. Also kids can take a bag for all their goodies that they get from each country.

Materials: blank paper, card stock, staplers, staples





Photo:



Name:

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Today's Date:

Photo:



Name:

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Today's Date:


2.
Memorize the continents & Oceans

Continents
(to the tune of “Where is Thumbkin?”)

There are seven
There are seven
continents
continents
North and South America
Europe, Asia, Africa,
Australia, Antarctica

Perhaps have one student represent each continent. They point to their continent when it's said.

Oceans
(Tune: "My Bonnie")

Atlantic's the name of an ocean.
Pacific and Indian, too.
The Arctic is often forgotten.
And Southern's the last one to do!

Materials: map, lyrics


Continents
(to the tune of “Where is Thumbkin?”)

There are seven
There are seven
continents
continents
North and South America
Europe, Asia, Africa,
Australia, Antarctica



Oceans
(Tune: "My Bonnie")

Atlantic's the name of an ocean.
Pacific and Indian, too.
The Arctic is often forgotten.
And Southern's the last one to do!

3.

Wisher of the day: Steve Fosset
http://www.airportjournals.com/Display.cfm?varID=0610009
In the book Around the World in 80 Days, Finneas Fogg imagined that it would be possible to travel around the world in a hot air balloon. About 100 years later, that possibility was realized.
American adventurer Steve Fosset has attempted the global balloon flight six times. On 8 January 1996 he embarked solo from South Dakota in Solo Challenger. Technical problems forced him to land three days later in eastern Canada. The balloon was rebuilt and renamed Solo Spirit. A year later Fossett launched from St Louis and flew for more than six days before landing in India. Flying halfway around the earth, he set new world ballooning records for distance and duration. His duration record was eclipsed the following year by the Swiss Breitling Orbiter team, but his distance record stood. On 31 December 1997 he made a third attempt with a larger Roziere envelope but had to land in south eastern Europe due to bad weather and technical problems.
The January 1997 Solo Spirit attempt launched from St. Louis and ended six days later in India.
The contest continues The same night that Fossett had embarked on his third attempt, another solo adventurer, Kevin Uliassi, launched from Illinois. He landed three hours later following the rupture of the helium cell in his Roziere envelope. In January 1998 the Global Hilton team launched its Roziere balloon from Albuquerque, New Mexico. Despite a flawless launch, crew members Dick Rutan and Dave Melton aborted the flight a couple of hours later when their helium cell burst. The two men parachuted to safety. The balloon was destroyed by fire when it landed in Texas later in the day. Steve Fossett again launched from Mendoza, Argentina on 7 August 1998 in Solo Spirit. He set a new record covering 15 200 miles, only to be forced down in bad weather off the coast of Australia. Upon landing in the ocean, the capsule turned upside down and began filling with water. The outside of the capsule was aflame, and Fossett was nearly overwhelmed by suffocating fumes from the resins lining the exterior of the capsule. Grabbing his 12-pound life raft and EPIRB beacon, which he had triggered during the descent, he climbed from the capsule as the storm continued to rage around him. Incredibly, he was injured and brought to safety by the Australian coast guard.
In August 1998 Steve Fossett took Solo Spirit from Argentina as far as Australia when bad weather halted his 4th record setting attempt.
A stunning view
At 8.05 GMT on Monday 1 March 1999 Swiss Betrand Piccard, on his third attempt, teaming with Briton Brian Jones, launched the Breitling Orbiter 3 from Chteau d’Oex in the Swiss Alps. They climbed to an altitude of 7′000 meters (21′000 feet) in a little more than one hour, reporting a stunning view of the Matterhorn as they cruised out of Switzerland into Italy. 19 days, 1 hour and 49 minutes later, at 09h54 (GMT) hours on Saturday 20 March 1999 they passed the finishing line of 9.27 over Mauritania, North Africa, becoming the first balloonists to circumnavigate the globe with a non-stop, non-refueled flight, having traveled 42,810 kilometres.
They did it! Breitling Orbiter 3 is the first hot air balloon to circumnavigate the globe.
Betrand Piccard and Brian Jones – first around the world in a hot air balloon, March, 20 1999.
First solo circumnavigation Not to be outdone, Steve Fossett again braved the skies in a solo flight. On Tuesday 2 July 2002 Fossett became the first to achieve solo circumnavigation of the world in a hot air balloon.


Discuss transportation today how long does it take to travel around the world?




Wisher: Steve Fossett

Wished for: to be the first balloonist to circumnavigate the globe.

Hardships: he failed five times then another team was successful.

Magic: Continued to try. He would attempt to be the first SOLO trip.

Success: His sixth attempt was a success. Not only did he accomplish the first solo balloon trip around the world, but he also broke two other records. He was the fastest to circumnavigate the globe in a balloon (less than 14 days) and he broke the hot air balloon speed record (he traveled at over 200 miles per hour).





4,5,6,7.

On large map, travel around the world.

Stamp passport at each country.

Itinerary

Day 1
Start in London, England.
See the sights of the city: St. Paul's Cathedral, Lodon Eye, Big Ben, Royal guard
Role play the royal guards at Buckingham palace – try to make guards laugh.
Sample English muffins (crumpets) & jam

take a train to the coast, a boat across the channel, & a train to Mediterranean Sea.

Day 2
Taker a steamer through the Suez canal in Egypt.
Egypt – sights: camels, pyramids, Suez Canal, hieroglyphs
write name in hieroglyphs & make cartouch
Suez canal

Day 3
Stop off in Yemen for coal for the steamer.
See the sights: a mosque, a market, Women in Wadi Hadhramaut wearing conical hats said to help them stay cool, and Al-Hajjara (a village carved out of the rocky landscape in the 11th century)
try on turban
try hummus & flat bread

Day 4
travel by train and elephant across India
See the sights: Taj Mahal, Hindu goddess, Indian elephant, Henna tattoo
Discuss Indian vs. African elephants
Put bindi on the girls

Day 5
Travel by boat to China
See the sights in China: great wall, their dwellings (yurt), panda, Buddhist temple
Discuss the population of China and the world
Try some Tai Chi
Sample some noodles

Day 6
Travel by steamer to San Francisco.
Eat sourdough bread in San Francisco

Day 7
Take trains across America
See the sights across the USA – San Francisco, Utah, Wyoming, New York
The tallest building in America is the Empire State Building. It's 105 stories tall. Have 105 beans in a jar and let the students try to guess the amount.

Day 8
Travel by steamer back to England. - Celebrate accomplishment!

Materials: english muffins, jam, hieroglyphs, cartouches, pencils, paper, cloth, hummus, flatbread, plates, knives, bindi, population pie chart, noodles, sourdough bread, comparison chart of buildings, beans in jar, pictures of London, palace guards, Egypt, Suez Canal, Yemen, Steamboat, turban, India, elephants, bindi, China, San Francisco, Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Illinois, New York




tally & recognize the progress

Closing activity:
Each child gets flags with their names on them. Leader calls out a fairy tale character and the students race to be the first to place their flags on the country where the fairy tale is set.
or
Teams of two, one globe for each team. Teacher calls out a fairy tale character and the first team to locate on the globe where that fairy tale is from gets one point.
Kids can play a game of pass the globe and name a city in the state that they is yelled by the teacher or a kid or who ever has the globe at that time.
Materials: blow-up globes, maps, flags, fairy-tale characters

Other ideas:
Compare sizes of buildings in NYC. Take a walk through the big city. Kids can use this to learn about the different heights of building in this city or if they can name some of the buildings there. They can turn stories into feet
plan trip around the world – plane, boat, etc., how much time in each place, what route to take.
Tell them what countries we're going to visit & they plan the route and what sights they want to see in each country.
Lowell H. Smith
Lowell H. Smith (1892—November 4, 1945) was a pioneer American airman, who perfomed the first mid-air refueling (along with Lieuenant John P. Richter), setting an endurance record of 37 hours on De Havilland DH-4B (August 23, 1923). Smith, as the First Lieutenant, with mechanic Leslie P. Arnold, was also abroad "Chicago" airplane, which among two others made the first aerial circumnavigation in 1924. Smith held 16 records for military aircraft in speed, endurance and distance.
Smith first became an aviator for the Mexican Army (1915), but in 1917 joined the Army Air Service. In 1919 he found himself able to participate in the Great Transcontinental Air Race. However on the evening of October 15 his aircraft was destroyed by fire when lanterns being used by mechanics ignited a wing. Smith received permission to continue the race if he could find a replacement aircraft. Prospects seemed dim until Major Carl Andrew Spaatz arrived on October 17. It took only a little pleading before Spaatz agreed to turn over his plane to Smith. Going on to conquer wind and weather, Smith became the first West Coast flier to complete the round trip when he arrived in San Francisco on October 21.
In 1936, Smith was appointed to the War Department Board for standardizing airplane design and procurement procedures. Under his guidance from February, 1942, to March, 1943, Davis-Monthan became the top training base for B-17 and B-24 crews during World War II.
Smith died from injuries suffered when he fell from a horse in the Catalina Foothills, Arizona and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Lowell H. Smith Elementary School at Tucson, Arizona was named after him.
A very early Army aviator, in 1915 he served as a pilot with the revolutionary forces of Pancho Villa in Mexico. He later set a record for remaining in air for 37 consecutive hours. In 1923 he was first pilot to take part in air-to-air refueling of an aircraft. He was a major participant in the US Army Air Service 1924 Flight Around The World.
He died on November 4, 1945 and was buried with full military honors in Section 3 of Arlington National Cemetery.


Inquiries

Make postcards representing the counties you “visit.”
Inquiries

Identify the many countries represented in "it's a small world." Take a blank world map and color in and label each of these countries.

Calculate how long it would take to travel around the world. What mode of transportation would you use? How long would it take using a different mode of transportation?

Make a book fair. Display the best books of all time, from all over the world. If you would like to display books that you don't own, you can print out the cover art.

Similar to the story of Around the World in 80 Days, write a story about an adventurer who went around the world in eight days.

What would you invent that would take you around the world in eight days?

If you were to travel around the world in 80 days, what places would you visit? How long would you stay in each of these places?

Translate the phrase, "it's a small world" into eight different languages.

What is your favorite place on earth? Why is it your favorite? Find out from others what their favorite places are and why. Discuss with them your reasons. Is your opinion swayed by their opinions? Write about it in your wishes! Journal.

Construct a miniature "it's a small world."

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