Celebration Education

Apr 19-23

4/13 Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage

In the Deep (Andrew Lost Series #8)

Inquiries

Propose a plan that will help rebuild the Great Barrier Reef. Write your ideas in your Wishes! Journal, complete with illustrations.

Make a big book about the fish that live in the Great Barrier Reef. Make the pictures of the fish life-size.

Write an explanation about the live of the Great Barrier Reef.

If you could create a Great Barrier Reef off the coast of California, what would it be like? Draw your design.

Define what a reef is and what a tide pool is.

Retell the story of Nemo, but instead of fish in the ocean, use animals in the desert.

With a friend, act out one of the scenes from Nemo.

Estimate how far Nemo’s father traveled in order to find Nemo.

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Replies to This Discussion

Great Barrior Reef

1.
Diarama
2.
Finding Nemo
3.
Fish sorting
4.
Animal classification
5.
Wisher
6.
Future: Save the world (earth day)
7.
Jenga: Great Barrior Reef Version
8. Go fish

1.
tissue paper (red, orange, yellow)
white glue
wax paper
paintbrushes
scissors
cardstock
glue
scissors
2.
Picture of Nemo Characters
Great Barrier Reef map
matching game
pictures of fish
3.
Fish
Poster
Fish key
4.
Posters
pictures and descriptions of animals.

5.
Wisher Poster
Wisher Pictures
6.
Situations

7.
Jenga
Great Barrior Reef Cards
8.
Go fish cards


Great Barrior Reef
1. Diarama
--- Song ---
---Sharing ---
2. Finding Nemo
3. Fish sorting
4. Animal classification
5. Wisher
6. Future: Save the world (earth day)
7. Jenga: Great Barrior Reef Version
8. Go fish

1.
Gathering activity:

The Great Barrier Reef is made of coral. Corals are living organisims that live in compact colonies. Their skeletons stack up to form the coral reefs. These reefs become the habitats for a variety of animals.
Living coral is usually a brown color. Dead coral is white. Why are some corals different colors?
“Everywhere we went in the islands, anemones and corals bore bright pastel pigments that fluoresced brilliantly orange, red, or green. The molecules that create this fluorescence could serve as sunscreens, or as light absorbers to boost growth. But in some cases these colors can be co-opted by unrelated creatures. We saw one common coral with fluorescent pink splotches, which appear on damaged spots that are healing. Fish are attracted to the pink spots and bite at them. A small parasite has evolved to infest this coral, causing harm, which leads to more pink patches that attract fish. The fish nibble the spots, thus taking up the parasite and becoming its host. Even a small parasite has developed a way to use color for its own survival.” http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2005/05/coral-reefs/kaufman-text/4
http://www.abcteach.com/free/c/cr_art_tissueproject.pdf
Materials: tissue paper, white glue, wax paper, paintbrushes, scissors, cardstock, tape, coral, pictures of coral.
May use the coral from this activity to create diaramas using cut outs of fishes and coral and real shells as the lesson progresses.



2.
Topic activity: Finding Nemo
Kids can now learn about where the great barrier reef is located on the map how big it is and how many islands or on the reef and why there are so many fish and other sea creatures there.
Show the picture of the Finding Nemo characters. Ask the students if they know where Nemo lives. (Great Barrier Reef)
Where is the Great Barrier Reef?
Show the map of the reef and tell the students that the Great Barrier Reef is the world's largest reef system. It is composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching over an area of approximately 133,000 square mles. The reef is located off the coast in northeast Australia.
Have the students play a matching game to determine the what kinds of animals the different creatures in Finding Nemo are.
Students can add these fish to their diaramas.
Materials: Picture of Nemo Characters, Great Barrier Reef map, matching game, pictures of fish, string



Nemo's home
Sea anemone
Dory
Regal Tang
Nemo
Clownfish
Crush
Sea Turtle
Jacques
Pacific cleaner shrimp
Peach
Seastar
Mr. Ray
Eagle Ray
Nigel
Brown Pelican




Barracuda
Bloat
Puffer fish
Bubbles
Yellow Tang
Gill
Moorish Idol


Sea anemone

Eagle Ray

Clownfish

Sea Turtle

Pacific cleaner shrimp

Regal Tang

Starfish

Barracuda

Brown Pelican

Moorish Idol

Puffer fish

Yellow Tang


3.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/teachers/activities/2215_reef.html
Have a poster with names of fishes and proceed through steps to figure out which fish is which. They can add their fish to their diarama.
Materials: Fish pictures, Fish Key

Fish key
Stand up if your fish is long and skinny.
If the fish has spiky fins, it is a trumpet fish.

If the fish has smooth fins, it is a spotted moray eel.

Stand up if your fish has both eyes on top of the head.

If the fish has long whip-like tail, it is a spotted eagle ray.

If the fish has short, blunt tail, it is a peacock flounder.

Stand up if your fish has spots.

If your fish has chin “whiskers,” it is a spotted goat fish.

If your fish does not have chin “whiskers,” it is a band-tail puffer.

Stand up if your fish does not have stripes. It is a glassy sweeper.

Stand up if your fish is orange.

If your fish has a v-shaped tail, it is a squirrel fish.

If fish has a blunt tail, it is a glass-eye snapper.


trumpet fish

moray eel

Eagle Ray

Peacock Flounder

Spotted Goatfish

band-tail puffer

glassy sweeper

squirrel fish

glass-eye snapper


4.
review the animal classification rap: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euPTD0OPGu4
create animal classification trees similar to this: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/figures/1471-2105-6-208-2-l.jpg
Add creatures and shells to diorama.
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species

Animal
Vertebrate
Mammal
Primate
Hominid
Homo
Sapien




Cetacean
Dolphin
Ocean Dolphin
Irrawaddy Dolphin



Ray-finned fish
Perch-like
Thorn-tail
Paracanthurus
Regal Tang


Mollusc
Bivalve
Euheterodonta
Giant Clam
Saltwater Giant Clam
Pa'ua



Inkfish
Cuttlefish
Sepiida
Sepia
Broadclub Cuttlefish


Cnidaria


True Jellyfish
Tentacle-less Jellyfish
Mastigildae
Phyllorhiza
Australian Spotted Jellyfish



Colony Dwellers
Stony Coral
Acroporidae
Acropora
Elkhorn Coral





Sea Anemone
Actinia
Beadlet Anemone

Plant
Flowering Plant
One-leaf Seed
Alismatale
Aquatic Plant
Tape-grass
Paddle Weed

Algae
Heterokont
Brown Aglae
Kelp
Large Kelp
Laminaria
Oarweed

Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species


Animal
Vertebrate
Mammal
Primate
Hominid
Homo
Sapien

Animal
Vertebrate
Mammal
Cetacean
Dolphin
Ocean Dolphin
Irrawaddy Dolphin

Animal
Vertebrate
Ray-finned fish
Perch-like
Thorn-tail
Paracanthurus
Regal Tang

Animal
Mollusc
Bivalve
Euheterodonta
Giant Clam
Saltwater Giant Clam
Pa'ua

Animal
Mullusc
Inkfish
Cuttlefish
Sepiida
Sepia
Broadclub Cuttlefish

Animal
Cnidaria
True Jellyfish
Tentacle-less Jellyfish
Mastigildae
Phyllorhiza
Australian Spotted Jellyfish

Animal
Cnidaria
Colony Dwellers
Stony Coral
Acroporidae
Acropora
Elkhorn Coral

Animal
Cnidaria
Colony Dwellers
Stony Coral
Sea Anemone
Actinia
Beadlet Anemone

Plant
Flowering Plant
One-leaf Seed
Alismatale
Aquatic Plant
Tape-grass
Paddle Weed

Algae
Heterokont
Brown Aglae
Kelp
Large Kelp
Laminaria
Oarweed



5.
wisher: Casey Sokolovic http://oceans4ever.com/2009/04/06/make-a-difference-monday-one-girl...
and/or John Halas http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/jun2009/2009-06-08-092.asp
May do both – divide the class into two groups.
materials: wisher poster, wisher pictures
Casey Sokolovic

Wish: Save Sea Turtles.
Casey and family visited the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in Topsail Island, North Carolina, in 2005 on a family trip, and little did everyone know – including Casey – that it would spark not only a passion for an animal, but a drive to make a difference in that animal’s fate – a drive that’s burning just as strong, if not stronger today.

Hardships:
She was only ten at the time.
Ten
Magic:
Go forward with plans.
As Casey tells it, it was seeing turtles injured and sick with disease at Topsail that made her want to help. And as her mom, Kay, tells it, it was a natural outgrowth of her personality that led her establish her organization “Help Them LAST” (which stands for Love A Sea Turtle), to bake and sell turtle-shaped cookies, participate in school fundraisers on their behalf, ignite the interest of everyone she could possibly find and when she was “done,” present the turtle hospital in Topsail with a check for $2,500.

Success:
Casey’s sea turtle conservation success has not gone unnoticed. Last year, she was recognized for her efforts by being chosen as one of five finalists for the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes, an award given each year to a young standout in conservation.



John Halas

Wished for:
To help preserve the coral reefs off the coast of Florida.

Hardships:
John noticed the damage that happens when boats drop anchor on coral reefs. He wanted to stop the damage. But with so many boats who use the area, what could be done?

Magic:
Reef mooring buoys
These buoys eliminate the need to drop anchor on fragile coral reefs by providing boaters with a convenient means of securing their vessels.

Success:
In addition to stopping the anchor damage to the reefs, he won the inaugural Ocean Heroes Award given by the nonprofit oceans conservation group Oceana.



Ten


6.
Earth day activities - future
http://geography.mrdonn.org/greatbarrierreef.html
In groups of two, the students are given these situations. With their given personalities, they will come up with ideas of how the Great Barrier Reef can be preserved. Then they present their ideas to the Reef Preservation Society (the class).
Materials: Situations
You run an aquafarm growing oysters. You have been in business for over 10 years and employ 23 people to care for and harvest the oysters. You have already seen your profits cut in half since you started the business due to all the additional environmental restrictions and laws.


You are a commercial fisherman. You have been a fisherman your whole life, your father was a fisherman, your grandfather was a fisherman. Fishing along the reef is good. You are contented with the way things are.


You are a tour guide. You make your living giving scuba and snorkel tours along the Great Barrier reef. You are finding that to get to colorful areas of the reef you are having to go further and further from port. The areas of the reef nearest port are dead. You would like to help fix the reef and still make a living.


You are a marine biologist studying the reef. You can see the effects of pollution and the disturbance of man on the reef. You would like to pass laws keeping everyone off the reef except for Scientists like yourself.


You own a farm. The only way to protect your crops from insects is to spray pesticides on them. You live five miles from the ocean so you don't see any problem with spraying. Yet people keep blaming you for killing the reef.


You are a tourist. You visit the reef every year on tour and have several excellent examples of reef coral at home. The reef is 1200 miles long so what harm is there in taking a small piece home as a souvenir. You would like to see the reef protected but do not want to lose your vacation spot.


You own an oil tanker traveling between Australia and Indonesia. When you get out away from port and out to sea you wash down your ship to get rid of all the spilled oil off the decks. There are on laws or regulations preventing this and every tanker captain does it.


You are a surfer. This is your love. You will do anything to protect the reef. The reef keeps out sharks and other predators from the prime surfing areas. You don't want resorts or hotels built since they bring in too many people who will get in the way of your surfing.


You are a bird watcher. The birds that exist in the wetlands near the reef can be found nowhere else in the world. Resorts and hotels are developing this land and destroying the habitat of your beloved birds.


You own a brand new resort hotel. You need the tourists to stay in business. Yes you did destroy some wetlands to create your resort but you had the permission of the government.


You are a bartender at the hotel. You left the city because you couldn't find work. You love living at the resort and make very good money. You really don't care about the reef but you need this job.


You are a conservationist. You want every thing to be the way nature made it.


You are a sport fisherman. You visit the area because of the great fishing. You would oppose anything that might stop or reduce the fishing.


You are a mine worker. The mine is very close to losing money. Any more regulations that raise the cost of mining and the mine will go out of business and you will lose your job.


You are an Aborigine. Your people have hinted and fished on this land for thousands of years. You need to continue your peoples traditions without interference.


You are a tour guide. You operate eco-tours whereby using a glass bottomed boat tourists can see the reef without ever touching it. Business has been getting better every year. You have noticed that each year more and more of the reef is destroyed or dying.


You are a scuba diver. You travel the world looking for the best places to dive. You never destroy or interfere with any of the natural habitats you see. You always take pictures and have actually sold many of these pictures to magazines. You want the reef to remain the way it has always been.


You are the harbor master. If the reef grows it might close the port. If the port closes many people will lose their job. You routinely authorize divers to destroy the part of the reef nearest the port entrance.


You work in a gift shop near the resort. You make a lot of money selling pieces of coral, shells and sharks teeth to tourists. You are happy with the way things are.


You own the waste treatment plant. You are already operating at capacity. You cannot afford to build more treatment facilities yet any more growth in the area will cause waste to go untreated into the sea.


You have just bought a beach house. You want to keep the resorts and condominiums out and the price of real estate high. You don't want cheap housing to ruin the neighborhood.


You own a small oceanfront restaurant. With the new resorts business is so good you want to expand.


You work for a pharmaceutical company that makes an asthma medicine out of the coral. You need large segments of coral to produce this medicine.


You are retired. Reef walking is one of your major hobbies. Without it you don't know what you would do.


You are a business person. You like to go out on your boat on the weekends and anchor out on the reef and just relax. You don't like the government telling you where you can go.


You have just graduated and are spending a year traveling the world. You camp out on the beach and just bum around. You don't see what the big fuss is all about.

7.
Jenga Great Barior Reef edition
Materials: Jenga, GBR cards


8.
Go Fish
Materials: go fish cards

Other ideas:
Large group activity:
Kids can pretend to swim at the reef and this is where the teacher can show them different plants and see creatures while they are swimming there it can be like their own under water sight seeing adventure.
Something about Australia


Follow up activity:
Kids can now learn about the different temp and the depth of the water. This is where they can work with numbers and find that’s why the fish and other sea creatures like to live there.
Materials: maps, pencils, paper, shells

Animal classifications
In groups, have students sort the reef animals by class or by what they eat. Or have them complete a table that shows several characteristics.
Mammals
Reptiles
Fish
Echinoderms
Crustaceans
Annelids
Molluscs
Cnidarians.
The headings might include, for example:
Name of animal
Type of habitat it occupies
Appearance (colour, shape, size, etc)
Special characteristics
Food
Mode of locomotion
Threats to its survival
Mode of defense.
Consumers eat other organisms, and several types exist, including:
Herbivores – animals that eat plants
Carnivores – animals that eat other animals
Omnivores – animals that eat both plants and animals
Piscivores – animals that eat fish
Planktivores – animals that eat plankton.
Materials: Posters, pictures and descriptions of animals.


Great Barrior Reef
Inquiries
http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngexplorer/0304/adventures/inde...
http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/usa_game/holiday_memory/great_barri...
http://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/parks/sea/4reefs1.html

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