Celebration Education

Apr 26-30

4/27 Innoventions

I, Robot

Inquiries

Using the scientific method, come up with a hypothesis method, come up with a hypothesis to test. Test it, measure your results, and write about the experience.

Write the biography of a robot.

What new inventions are set to come to the market soon? Which inventions do you think will sell well? Which will flop in the market? Which inventions do you think will still be in use by the time your children are your age?

Prepare your own inventions to be presented at the Imagination Institute next week. Be prepared to explain why your invention in the best.

Can you improve on some one else’s invention? Choose an invention to restructure and make it better. Write about it in your Wishes! Journal.

What is one of the greatest inventions ever? Learn how to operate the invention.

Make an invention that you could use to invite people to the Imagination Institute award ceremony.

Take a survey. Ask people what they think the next great invention will be. Compile the list and store it in an envelpe or folder for a few years. It will be interesting to see if any of those inventions materialized.

Views: 44

Replies to This Discussion

Inventions


1.Make catapults
2.2000 years of inventions
3.10,000 failures, 1,093 patents
4.Wisher: Christiaan Huygens
5.Who's an inventor?
6.A Method to the Madness
7.Brain exercise
8.On Target

Materials:

1.popscicle sticks
rubber bands

2.pictures of inventions
inventor posters
stick glue
scissors

3.beans
counting sheet

4.Wisher poster
wisher picture

5.Inventor's Affirmations
Invention ideas

6.Scientific method puzzles
Scientific method form
string
washers
stick glue
blank paper

7.Brain puzzle problems
craft sticks

8.Catapults (from activity 1)
projectiles (marshmallows?)
targets





Inventions

1.Make catapults

---song---
---sharing---
---overview---

2.2000 years of inventions

3.10,000 failures, 1,093 patents

4. Wisher: Christiaan Huygens

5.Future: Who's our next great inventor?

6.A Method to the Madness

7. Brain exercise

8.On Target


1.
Make catapults
http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Build-A-Simple-Catapult-62856692

Just like the video, except instead of gluing a cap on, use a rubber band for the spot to hold the projectile.

Materials: popscicle sticks, rubber bands





2.
Topic introduction:
One small step – each of these inventors did not invent these things from nothing, but they built on the accomplishments of previous inventors, each contributing a small step forward. http://www.ideafinder.com/features/smallstep/index.htm

Note: we will discuss more modern inventions next week.

Match inventions to inventors

Agriculture
Archimedes, Jethro Tull (seed drill)

Communications
Cai Lun (paper), Gutenberg (moveable type), Alexander Graham Bell (telephone), Farnsworth (television)

Medicine
Edward Jenner (Smallpox Vaccine), Louis Pasteur

Transportation
Wright brothers (airplane), Karl Benz (automobile)

Weapons
Leonardo Da Vinci, Oppenheimer (a-bomb),

In groups of two, each group has a poster of a certian category of invention with the inventors' names on them. Teacher introduces the different inventions and students identify who the inventors were. Have them add the inventions to their inventor posters.

Materials: Poster of inventors, pictures of inventions, stick glue, scissors (if they want to trim the pictures before placing them on)



Leonardo da Vinci
1452-1519

J. Robert Oppenheimer
1904-1967

Orville Wright 1871- 1948
Wilbur Wright 1867-1912


Karl Benz
1844-1929

Louis Pasteur
1822-1895

Edward Jenner
1749-1823

Philo Farnsworth
1906-1971

Alexander Graham Bell
1847-1922

Johannes Gutenberg
c. 1398-1468

Cai Lun
ca. 50

Jethro Tull
1674-1741


Archimedes
287 BC - c. 212 BC


3
“I have not failed, not once. I’ve discovered ten thousand ways that don’t work.”
Thomas Edison's 1,093 patents

In groups, see who can count Edison's patents the fastest. You may want to give them the counting sheet without any explanation. Let them solve the easiest way to count.

Materials: beans, counting sheet


4.
Wisher
Christiaan Huygens was a Dutch mathematician who patented the first pendulum clock, which greatly increased the accuracy of time measurement. He laid the foundations of mechanics and also worked on astronomy and probability.

Materials: Wisher poster, wisher picture

Wisher: Christiaan Huygens

Wished for: Create pendulum clock

The pendulum clock was conceived by Galileo Galilei around 1637. It was the earliest known pendulum clock design, but it was never completed.

Hardship: Christiaan knew math and science, so was able to design the pendulum clock, which he patented in 1657. But he was not a clockmaker and could not make it himself.

Magic:

He hired a watchmaker to make it for him.

The pendulum clock was a breakthrough in timekeeping. The introduction of the pendulum increased the accuracy of clocks enormously, from about 15 minutes per day to 15 seconds per day. Pendulum clocks remained the world standard for accurate timekeeping for 270 years, until the invention of the quartz clock in 1927.




5.
You are an inventor.

Follow the outline below.

Materials: Inventor's Affirmations, Invention ideas

Stand up if:

You are a person who thinks new things.

You like to create new things.

You are curious.

You like to try new things.

You will work on a project for a long time.

Inventors share their inventions.

You like to show others what you create.

Tell each individual student that they are brilliant and read the Inventor's Affirmations.

Tell about Six-year-old Suzanna Goodin. She is brilliant. She got tired of cleaning the cat food spoon, so came up with the idea of an edible spoon-shaped cracker. She won a grand prize for her invention in the Weekly Reader National Invention Contest.

Next week is the Imagination Institute. Each student should bring an invention of their own. It can be something new that they thought up and works, an improvement on something that already exists, or simply a model or drawing of something that they wish would be invented.

For the any students who may have a hard time coming up with something, give them student some ideas that they can expand on (perhaps they can be placed inside fortune cookies?)


Engineer some new kind of clothing. Zippers, buttons, ties, and pulls could all be improved upon. You can do it!

New and better kinds of jewelry are being created everyday. Two young girls became millionaires from finding a new way to make bottle cap jewelry.

What hobby do you enjoy? Find a way to make it easier, faster, or better.

Do you enjoy sports? Create a contraption that can improve your skills or score.

Maybe you can think of a device to make pet care easier or more efficient. Ideas might be an automatic dog walker, a pet groomer, a new kind of pooper scooper, or a way to keep litter boxes fresher longer.

Create a new board game, video game, or toy. We always need new motorized toys and remote control cars, trucks, robots, and airplanes.

How about a currency sanitizer? How would that work?

Look around the house and choose any item you see. Imagine if it was bigger, smaller, faster, slower, or different in some way.

What bothers you? Annoying and irritating things are not just problems, but opportunities for easy ideas for new products and inventions.

Like toothpaste tubes? What else can be put in tubes? What size should the tubes be? This is a concept ripe for some new invention ideas.

Help reduce waste. What disposable item can you make reusable?

What about something that would make life easier for someone with disabilities?




Inventors

Inventors are persons who think of, create, or make something that is new.

Inventors are curious.

Inventors like to tinker with their ideas.

Inventors are persistent.

Inventors share their inventions.

Inventors are constantly inventing.
Inventor's Affirmations

You are brilliant.
It's a fact.
It is your life that makes you brilliant.
Your life is unique; it is full of obstacles, but also full of inspiration.
Every situation you encounter, every problem you face, it keeps your mind going.
You're human. You can't avoid it.
Your brain keeps showing up with uncounted ideas and solutions.
Every single day.

6.
Scientific method
The students may want to use the scientific method when working on their inventions.

In groups, have the students put together the scientific method puzzles.

Galileo claimed that a simple pendulum is isochronous, i.e. that its swings always take the same amount of time, independently of the amplitude. Galileo conducted several experiments with pendulums. It is popularly believed that these began by watching the swings of the bronze chandelier in the cathedral of Pisa, using his pulse as a timer.

Have the students make pendulums then use the scientific method to discover if Galileo was correct about the pendulum being isochronous.

Complete the form all together.

Materials: Scientific method puzzle, scientific method form, pendulums, stick glue, blank paper, string,
washers



Hypotheses:
A simple pendulum is isochronous.
Procedure:
Using your own pulse as a timer, measure how long each swing lasts.
Data:

Findings:


7
Brain teasers to help increase brain power
http://scifiles.larc.nasa.gov/text/kids/Problem_Board/problems/inve...

Have the students work in groups to solve the three problems.

Materials: Brain puzzle problems, craft sticks


Goal Post
This goalpost is upside down! Rearrange the sticks so that the goal-post is right side up and the football is inside. Try to do it in just two moves.

Triangles
Reposition three sides from the figure to get five triangles. See if you can do it in just three moves!

Hint: All five triangles won't be the same size.



Predator & Prey
You have 15 seconds to rearrange the sticks so that the fish is facing in the opposite direction. Can you solve it with only three moves?



8
experiment with the catapults

Materials: Catapults (from activity 1), projectiles (marshmallows?), targets







Other Ideas

Kids can learn about some of the biggest inventions of these times and the people that invented them, Galileo who invented the telescope, thermometer, pendulum also there was Blaise Pascal who invented the calculator. In the 18th century there was inventors like Jethro Tull who invented a lot of the farming thing we see today also Bartolomeo Cristofori who invented the piano, and in the early 19th century, Count Alessandro Volta invented the battery, Michael Faraday invented the first toy balloon
Large group activity.
Kids can work on creating their own telescope, thermometer or pendulum.
Small group activity:
Kids can play a game where they can learn about the different kinds of farming equipment and what they are used for.. Also the kids can learn how a piano works.
Follow up activity
Kids can take a look inside a battery to see what it is made of and how it works.
Follow up activity
Kids can learn about the typewriter made by W.A. Burt and why it was made and how it works.

Conclusion activity.
Kids can play with toy balloons










At the park


Gathering:

Brain teasers &

Marshmallow Robots
What You’ll Need:
Large marshmallows
Miniature marshmallows
Pretzel sticks
Set out bowls of large marshmallows, small marshmallows, and pretzel sticks. Let each guest make a marshmallow robot using the pretzel sticks to hold them together. If you wish, take a group photo of the children with their creations before they eat them!


1.Scientific Method
materials: puzzles, blank paper, stick glue

2.Edison's 1,093 patents
materials: beans, counting paper

3.Imagineering/House of the future/plastics/Carousel of Progress/Edison Square
http://www.yesterland.com/futurehouse.html

4.Kids can have a debate about what is the greatest invention of all time or the next greatest invention. Then debate what their favorite game is.

5.Point, line, plane, qube
Materials: blank paper, pencils, large dice

6.3D technology
1.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LC_shutter_glasses
2.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereoscopy
3.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_display


Other ideas



Color an paste their own 3D glasses

Inventions
Inquiries

Relative Web sites:
http://web.mit.edu/invent/h-main.html
http://scifiles.larc.nasa.gov/text/kids/Problem_Board/problems/inve...
http://www.howstuffworks.com/
http://library.thinkquest.org/5847/
http://www.greatachievements.org/
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ahrpa/opa/kids/index.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/time/think.html

Using the scientific method, come up with a hypothesis to test. Test it, measure your results, and write about the experience.

Write the biography of a robot.

What new inventions are set to come to the market soon? Which inventions do you think will sell well? Which will flop in the market? Which of these inventions do you think will still be in use by the time your children are your age?

Prepare your own inventions to be presented at the Imagination Institute.

Can you improve on someone else’s invention? Choose an invention to restructure and make it better. Write about it in your Wishes! Journal.

What is one of the greatest inventions ever? Learn how to operate the invention.

Make an invention that you could use to invite people to an Imagination Institute award ceremony.

Take a survey. Ask people what they think the next great invention will be. Compile the list and store it in an envelope or folder for a few years. It will be interesting to see if any of those inventions materialize.

Formulate a plan to get more girls interested in science. Write your plan in your Wishes! Journal.

Make a list of the twenty greatest inventions of all time. Organize your list in chronological order or by type of invention. On a map of the world, mark where each of these things were invented.

Collect sketches and explanations of some of your favorite inventions.

Write a rhyming poem about a robot.

Who is your favorite inventor? If he (or she) had a resume, what would it look like? Make it.

Pretend you were chosen for the inventor or the year award. Write your acceptance speech.
Imagination Institute

1.“What if...”

--- Song ---
--- Sharing ---
--- Overview ---

2.Imagination Institute

3.Modern Inventions

4.Science Theory vs. Science fiction

5.Robot Programming

6.Imagination Exercises

7.Wisher: George Lucas

8.Imagination Skits


Materials:

1.“What if” papers
art paper, paint
paintbrushes
newsprint
cups, plates, or bowls for paint/water (if watercolor)

2.planets
sign-up list

3.Poster of inventors
pictures of inventions
stick glue
scissors (if they want to trim the pictures before placing them on)

4.matching game cards
blank books
markers
pencils

5.Robot program cards
blank paper

6.Event ideas
senses forms

7.Wisher poster
wisher pictures

8.items in bags
video camera?






IMAGINATION INSTITUTE


1. “What if...”

--- Song ---
--- Sharing ---
--- Overview ---

2.Imagination Institute

3.Modern Inventions

4.Science Theory vs. Science fiction

5.Robot Programming

6.Imagination Exercises

7. Wisher: George Lucas

8. Imagination Skits

1.
Imagination art “what if...”

Lay newsprint on the table. Give students slips of paper with scenarios. Let them finish the what if question by painting a picture.

1.What if you could travel at the speed of light?
2.What if you were fifty feet tall?
3.What if you could talk to animals?
4.What if an iceberg grew in your town?
5.What if you were the president of the United States?
6.What if you were the president of China?
7.What if you owned a dragon?
8.What if you lived in dinosaur times?
9.What if you grew roots?
10.What if you were the parent?
11.What if you never forgot anything?
12.What if you had super powers?


Materials: “What if” papers, art paper, paint, paintbrushes, newsprint, cups, plates, or bowls for paint/water (if watercolor)

What if you could travel at the speed of light?

What if you were fifty feet tall?

What if you could talk to animals?

What if an iceberg grew in your town?

What if you were the president of the United States?

What if you were the president of China?

What if you owned a dragon?

What if you lived in dinosaur times?

What if you grew roots?

What if you were the parent?

What if you never forgot anything?

What if you had super powers?

2. Student presentations

Each student shows the invention that they made.

Challenge for next week: If they would like to, each student can come to class next week prepared to share something about a planet in our solar system. Have them sign up for their planet this week and take a picture of their planet home to remind them (perhaps give the planets to the parents in the parent meeting). If necessary (or desired), you may include the sun, moon, asteroid belt, and Pluto.

Materials: planets, sign-up list


Class:

Sun:
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Moon:
Mars:
Asteroid Belt:
Jupiter:
Saturn:
Uranus:
Neptune:
Pluto:


Class:

Sun:
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Moon:
Mars:
Asteroid Belt:
Jupiter:
Saturn:
Uranus:
Neptune:
Pluto:


Sun:
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Moon:
Mars:
Asteroid Belt:
Jupiter:
Saturn:
Uranus:
Neptune:
Pluto:


Sun:
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Moon:
Mars:
Asteroid Belt:
Jupiter:
Saturn:
Uranus:
Neptune:
Pluto:





Sun

Sun

Mercury

Mercury

Mars

Mars

Earth


Earth

Moon

Moon

Venus

Venus



Asteroid belt
Asteroid belt

Jupiter
Jupiter




Saturn





Saturn

Uranus


Uranus


Neptune

Neptune
Pluto

Pluto





3.
Modern inventions

Just like last week, In groups of two, each group has a poster of a certian category of invention with the inventors' names on them. Teacher introduces the different inventions and students identify who the inventors were. Have them glue the inventions to their inventor posters.




Agriculture
Dr. Howard Resh (Hydroponics), Gordie ("Jack") C. Hanna (square tomato)

Communications
Steve Jobs (Apple Computer), Tim Berners-Lee (World Wide Web (not Internet))


Medicine
Christiaan Barnard (first heart transplant), Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield (Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI))


Transportation
Dean Kamen (Segway), Burt Rutan (space ship one)

Weapons
BAE Systems (Modern Tank), Boeing (unmanned combat air vehicle)

Materials: Poster of inventors, pictures of inventions, stick glue, scissors (if they want to trim the pictures before placing them on)

Dr. Howard Resh
Hydroponics
(from the Greek words hydro, water and ponos, labor)
a method of growing plants in water without soil.
Gordie ("Jack") C. Hanna

Square tomato
Genetically engineered tomato
Steve Jobs

Apple Computer
Tim Berners-Lee
World Wide Web

Christiaan Barnard
First heart transplant
Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
Dean Kamen
Segway
Burt Rutan
Space Ship One
Boeing
Boeing X-45
unmanned combat air vehicle
BAE Systems
Infantry fighting vehicle



4
Science Theory vs. Science Fiction

Science fiction is a genre of fiction. It differs from fantasy in that, within the context of the story, its imaginary elements are largely possible within scientifically established or scientifically postulated laws of nature (though some elements in a story might still be pure imaginative speculation). Exploring the consequences of such differences is the traditional purpose of science fiction, making it a "literature of ideas". Science fiction is largely based on writing rationally about alternative possibilities. The settings for science fiction are often contrary to known reality, but the majority of science fiction relies on a considerable degree of suspension of disbelief provided by potential scientific explanations to various fictional elements.

Play a matching game, matching the science theories to the science fiction.

1.Totalitarianism (1984)
2.time travel (The Time machine)
3.worm holes (Star Trek)
4.reversed poles (2012)
5.black holes (The Black Hole)
6.creating life (Frankenstein)
7.genetic enhancements (Spiderman)
8.prosthetic limb (Iron Man)
9.artificial intelligence (AI)
10.Inter-Planetary Travel (2001)
11.Robotics (I, robot)
12.Parallel Universe (Sliders)


Then in groups, make an illustrated story about the year 3000 (hopefully positive?). Provide “books” for them to complete.



Materials: matching game cards, blank books, markers, pencils





Science Theory

Time Travel
Science Theory
Worm Holes

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Theory
Polar Reversal

Science Theory
Black Holes

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Theory

Create Life
Science Theory
Genetic Enhancements
Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Theory
Prosthetic Limb

Science Theory
Totalitarianism

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Theory

Inter-Planetary Travel
Science Theory
Artificial Intelligence

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Theory
Robotics

Science Theory

Parallel Universe
Science Fiction

Science Fiction







5
robots

Program your robot. Cut & paste a series of commands to create a robot program. Other students follow the program instructions.

Materials: Robot program cards, blank paper

One step forward
One step forward
Turn
left
One step forward
One step forward
Turn
right
One step forward
One step forward
Turn
left
One step forward
One step forward
Turn
right
One step forward
One step forward
Pick up _____
One step forward
One step forward
Pick up _____
One step forward
One step forward
Drop
_____
One step forward
One step forward
Drop
_____





6
Imagination exercises
Exercise imagination by describing an event with rich sensory words.

In small groups, imagine an event. Name what you see, hear, taste, smell, and touch at the event. You may also name an emotion. Have the students write these on the senses form. You may help them write.

Events could include
1.First man on the moon
2.First private space flight
3.First heart transplant
4.Berlin wall coming down
5.First sheep cloning
6.Retrofitting the mark Twain steamboat to run on bio diesel
7.Tasting the first Flavr Savr tomato

After each group has had the opportunity to share what their senses would be, have the groups exchange their forms and then read them again, with the wrong senses associated with their event, For example, the group with the first man on the moon event would say that they smell sheep. It's like Mad Libs.

Materials: Event ideas, senses forms


First man on the moon

First private space flight

First heart transplant

Berlin wall coming down

First sheep cloning

Retrofitting the mark Twain steamboat to run on bio-diesel

Tasting the first Flavr Savr tomato




I see

I hear

I smell

I taste

I touch

I feel





I see

I hear

I smell

I taste

I touch

I feel





I see

I hear

I smell

I taste

I touch

I feel





7.
wisher: George Lucas

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000184/bio

Materials: wisher poster, wisher pictures

wisher: George Lucas

Wish ~ To be a Race Car Driver

Hardship ~ Car Accident

Magic ~ Befriending Francis Ford Coppola

The accident changed his views on life. He decided to attend Modesto Junior College before enrolling in the University of Southern California film school. As a film student he made several short films including THX-1138: 4EB (Electronic Labyinth) which won first prize at the 1967-68 National Student Film Festival. In 1967 he was awarded a scholarship by Warner Brothers to observe the making of Finian's Rainbow (1968) which was being directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Lucas and Coppola became good friends and formed a company called American Zoetrope in 1969.

Success ~ Star Wars ~ Indiana Jones

George Lucas now races cars as a hobby.



8.
Imagination skit
Have two or three groups. Provide a bag of miscellaneous items for each group. They use the items to create a commercial to advertise some new invention. Perhaps video record it?

Materials: items in bags, video camera?




Other ideas
entrepreneurship & philanthropy (PPG stuff?)

chutes & ladders game

Mr. Magorium's Imagination Emporium

science fiction instruments/sound effects/epecial effects



Venn diagram

Gathering
Paper airplanes kids can make old style ones to the new modern day, teacher can find a list how to make them online kids can have a competition to see if the new is better than the old. http://www.paperairplanes.co.uk/planes.php
Activity
Kids can create ac cardboard cockpit featuring modern day communications, modern day weapon systems. Teacher can get cut outs of thing that go in cockpit and the kids can paste them in.
Aeroplane cockpit or space ships: Paint a large cardboard box in colour of choice or cover with coloured paper. Stick on a mass of knobs and dials from bottle tops, jars and tubes. Turn the box into a rocket or space ship by covering it completely with heavy duty foil.
Kids can use their cockpits and pretend to use the communications to learn about how pilots talk kids can experiment while talking on how to hit the target using weapons and
communicating with other

robots' prime rules

http://www.pbs.org/nerds/

http://www.thetech.org/exhibits/online/robotics_new/universal/index...

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/time/timespeak.html

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